Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Plastic Skate

Little brother to the shark and manta ray!

Our Plastic Skate or Stingray

Our plastic stingray measure 6 inches from the tip of its nose to the tip of it's tail and is about 3 1/2 inches wide. It is gray plastic with dark gray hints on top and a yellow underside showing the mouth and gills. On the top side, you can see its two eyes painted with white and black. This stingray or skate would be a wonderful addition to a school project, aquatic diorama, or just to have as a toy or collectable. Check out our other skate and stringray toys and gifts.

About Skates and Stingrays

The stingrays are part of the Dasyatidae family. They are cartilaginous fishes related to sharks. They are common in coastal tropical and subtropical marine waters throughout the world. Stingrays get their name from the barbed stinger on their tail which is used for self-defense. Their stinger can reach a length of 35 cm and has two grooves with venom gland on the underside. The flat body of the stingray allows them camoflauge themselves in their environment by hiding beneath the sand. Stingrays use their sense of smell to locate their prey. They feed on molluscs, crustaceans and small fish. Stingrays are born into litters of five to thirteen. Parts of the stingray are edible. Mainly the wings and cheeks of the stingray are used as food the rest of it is considered too rubbery. The skin of stingrays can be used to make exotic shoes, belts, wallets and anything else leather is typically used for. People often ask how to tell the difference between a skate and a ray. Rays give birth to live young, while skates lay eggs. However, it is not usually possible to use this method when you are seeing one for a short period of time! Skates often have a more pronounce dorsalf in, but in truth, it is much easier to confuse them than to tell them apart, except for such unique-looking species ast the spotted eagle ray, the manta ray, and others you may become familiar with. Personally, I think this one is a skate, as skates often have a more pointed shape . . . but that's no guarantee! The manufacturer calls this one a "skatefish."

This blog is sponsored by Tapir and Friends Animal Store.

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